New York – Tara Donovan and Hiroshi Sugimoto

Continuing to explore the New York galleries, I headed to Chelsea with my old Icelandic comrade and superb photographer Mark Hartman.

Icelandic comrades re-united on a Vespa

Icelandic comrades re-united on a Vespa

By far the best work was at Pace Gallery. Two outstanding exhibitions by two of my all time favorite artists – Tara Donovan and Hiroshi Sugimoto. Both end on June 28th so get going!!!

Tara Donovan

Tara Donovan

This amazing geological work is composed of millions of of white index cards stacked on top of each other in sedimentary layers. The structures remind me of those dribble sand mounds you make at the beach. The textures when you get up close belie the scale and I found myself imagining scaling the cliffs of paper.

Getting lost in the detail

Getting lost in the detail

The detail reminds me of my friend Stephen Hilyard’s seductive Rapture of the Deep  photo series created from images of diving in the crystal waters of Iceland.

Dougal, Leysin 1977 from Stephen Hilyard's Rapture of the Deep series

Dougal, Leysin 1977

Going deeper.

Going deeper.

In the adjacent gallery was another of her hard to define, but oh so evocative large sculptures made from thousands of narrow square section rods of acrylic.

Tara Donovan Untitled

Tara Donovan
Untitled

Detail

Detail

As if that wasn’t delicious enough, in the adjacent gallery space was a huge showing of part of Hiroshi Sugimoto’s ongoing series of diorama photographs.They were presented beautifully. Huge black and white prints with immensely rich tonal range and detail,  mounted in fat black frames but with no glass, so there was nothing between you and the surface of the print – an open window onto an illusory landscape. They were all mounted high on the wall so that the I felt dwarved by the works. Almost as if I was a kid again peering over the lip of the dioramas at the Museum of Natural History (in Sydney, New York, San Francisco,Oslo, etc.). I’ve always loved dioramas and I feel already that they are going to be an important part of this trip – deja vu in hindsight – if there is such a thing.

Sugimoto in the woods

Sugimoto in the woods – c. 10 ft long!

Detail

Detail – luscious warm tones

Sugimoto on ice

Sugimoto on ice

Lone gull on the otherwise empty diorama.

Lone gull on the otherwise empty diorama.

Sugimoto and the Isbjørn

Sugimoto and the Isbjørn

A preview of travels and dioramas to come! Next stop Oslo……

Unfortunately, I won’t have internet access again until the end of June.

So stay tuned…..

New York – Kara E. Walker’s marvelous sugar baby

I guess I will have to rave about Kara Walker’s works at the Domino Sugar factory in Brooklyn – everyone else has. And justifiably so!

It’s very impressive, a pleasure to experience and, perhaps most importantly, a huge event drawing constant crowds of all sorts of people. I always wish art events would draw the sort of crowds that a baseball game does. Kara has hit a home run with ‘a Subtlety’.

The doomed facade of the Domino Sugar refinery.

The doomed facade of the Domino Sugar refinery.

a Subtlety

“a Subtlety”

The long view along the old sugar saturated silo

The long view along the old sugar saturated silo

Sugar picaninny collapsing in his own sweetness

Sugar picaninny collapsing in his own sweetness

Her Majesty!

Her Majesty!

Watching the crowd was 1/2 the fun!

Watching the crowd was 1/2 the fun!

Sugar coated selfies!

Sugar coated selfies!

I wanted to nibble on her toes!

I wanted to nibble on her toes!

Pareidolia – Opening January 16th.

I have a new solo exhibition on the (very near) horizon.

Here’s the announcement from my gallery!

Please come to the opening if you are anywhere nearby.

Pareidolia: New Works by Donald Fortescue

OPENS January 16, 6:30-8PM, Artist Reception

EXHIBITS January 16 – February 22, 2014

Oakland Art Murmur Celebration on February 7, 6-9PM
Vessel Gallery, 471 25th Street, Oakland, CA 94612, 510 893 8800
Gallery Hours:  Tuesday through Saturday, 11-6PM
You are cordially invited to join us as we kick off the New Year with the new and exciting solo show “Pareidolia: New Works by Donald Fortescue.” This exhibit is a culmination of the last three years of work created through residency programs he’s completed between 2011 and 2013. I’m most excited to bring forth Donald Fortescue’s distinct vision shaped by an early career as a scientist which later blossomed into an artist and a professor of design and craft.  I perceive Donald retains and applies the scientific approach to lab or field work to his studio artwork.  These last few years he has gone on expeditions to Snowmass, Colorado, to the Headlands in Marin and Bolinas, California, to Iceland and even to his native land, Australia, to gather his artistic findings.  There he engages in the field as a naturalist: he systematically and creatively gathers materials/native findings, such as tree branches to whittle and carve, or records and documents findings and photos to take back to the studio to study, experiment with, sculpt into visual and aural artworks. We’re most excited to present the fascinating works and opportunities for discoveries originated by Fortescue’s journeys included in “Pareidolia.”  — Lonnie Lee
Maculata #4 (2013) Archival digital print  H 32.5” x 44”

Maculata #4 (2013)
Archival digital print
H 32.5” x 44”

“”Pareidolia” is the psychological phenomenon whereby a vague or random stimulus (often an image or sound) is perceived as significant or having recognizable form – classical examples being seeing the “man” in the moon (or the “rabbit pounding rice” if you are Japanese), the Shroud of Turin, and the “face” in the Cydonia region of Mars.Much of my recent work explores this phenomenon. I’m interested in how information or meaning is read in patterns formed in nature and by human culture and technology? Detailed close-up images dissolve on close inspection revealing their fractal qualities (self similarity at varying scales) and leaving space for our imagination. Similar fractal qualities are also revealed in the digital and physical processes used in creating the work. Is there a correspondence between processes in nature and human technical processes and systems of thought?Is the ‘signal’ distinguishable from the ‘noise’?  Or is it just our imagination?I use contemporary digital technologies such as image manipulation software, 3D scanning and digital printing, video and sound, combined with more traditional hand-making processes and compare the inherent qualities or ‘artifacts’ of these processes with natural processes of emergent complexity and pattern formation.Most of the work in this exhibition is made in response to specific locations in northern Iceland, the south-east coast of Australia, the Rocky Mountains near Aspen, Marin County California, and at Bartram’s Garden in Philadelphia. As an artist who worked professionally as a scientist for many years, I’m interested in the common ground between the methodologies and philosophy of science and art.”
– Donald Fortescue

"On the level, #2" (2003 - 2013)  Study of installation, recycled redwood suspended in an array.

“On the level, #2” (2003 – 2013)
Study of installation, recycled redwood suspended in an array.

                

EXHIBITION  January 16 – February 22, 2014
ARTIST RECEPTION / OPEN  Thursday, January 16, 6:30-8PMARTIST TALK SERIES  Saturday, February 8, 2-3:30PM, refreshments following
Donald will give a presentation of his residency work with slides, and open discussionCELEBRATIONS  Friday, February 7, 6-9:00PM during Oakland Art Murmur,
and 3rd Thursday, February 20, 6:30-8PM
Music Performance The Haydn Enthusiasts is a society of amateur and professional musicians who appreciate and celebrate the genius of Joseph Haydn. Filled with unlimited creativity, Haydn’s string quartets are pinnacles of the genre, as well as the originals. Their mission is to present each quartet as a consciously crafted performance.
Vessel Gallery is located in the heart of Oakland’s Uptown Arts District
Use 19th St. Station at BART – a 7 minute walk to our district; paid parking, and street parking available nearby.
For Press Inquiries / interviews or further information on our stable of artists, contact:Lonnie Lee
Founder / Director / Curator
info@vessel-gallery.com
PRESS ROOM:  http://www.vessel-gallery.com/pressroom.html
Phone: 510 893 8800
Vessel Gallery

Vessel Gallery

Artifact and Translation

The climax of my stay at ANU was the exhibition “Artifact and Translation” that ran from October 1-5, 2013.

Here is the flier!

A3_poster.indd

It was a great opportunity to show the digital images I developed as a consequence of our field trip to the Kioloa Field Research Station, along with the whittlings and translations that we have all been working on.

Here’s the view when you entered the Foyer Gallery from the main entrance of the ANU School of Art.

Entering the gallery

Entering the gallery

With four large prints on the left,  my whittle translation in the center and everyone else’s whittles and translations along the far wall.

The four large ‘Old Blotchy’ prints. Developed from images taken of the gnarled and wrinkled skin of that grand old survivor.

Maculaata (Old Blotchy) #1-#4

Maculata (Old Blotchy) #1-#4

And a close up to see how it looks in real life.The photorealism breaks down.  The patterning which is an artifact of the Live trace software has been tuned to closely resemble the patterning that is natural to the Spotted Gum tree bark which flakes off periodically leaving pastel colored scars with the occasional bright orange scar from humans sgraffito. Natural artifact mapped into software artifact.

Maculata (Old Blotchy) #1 detail

Maculata (Old Blotchy) #1 detail

And my whittle translation. This is the first time I’ve used digitally manipulated images of whittles in my work – another digital translation of the hand made.

Teatree topology

Teatree topology

Each whittle was from a successive slice from a branch of Teatree harvested at Kioloa. It was interesting treating each successive, subtly different, slice as if I had never worked that material or form before. Exploring what moves with the knife worked and what the existing convoluted branch forms suggested.

Chunk of teatree.

Chunk of teatree.

First teatree whittle.

First teatree whittle.

Teatree topology translation

Teatree topology translation

Teatree topology detail

Teatree topology detail

Along the opposite wall was the series of 6 smaller prints.

Maculata #1-6

Maculata #1 – #6

I think this one is my favorite.

Maculata #4

Maculata #4

And close up.

Maculata #4 detail

Maculata #4 detail

The final portion of the show was the whittlings and inspired translations by all of the folk who joined in the field trip to Kioloa.

We arranged the whittlings along the wall on a narrow shelf (thanks for the timber donation Tim!), each accompanied by its translation into another medium or process, and a swing tag giving some clue as to its identity.

An array of whittles and translations.

An array of whittles and translations.

Some details.

Whittle, translations and tag by Pia Nemec

Whittle, translations and tag by Pia Nemec

Translation by Andrew Carvolth

Translation by Andrew Carvolth

Andrew created a tool, and used it on a piece of wood to create marks. The essence of whittling, translated into a whole new entity! Nice work.

Ashley, Brian and Shep trying to solve the puzzle.

Ashley and Brian trying to solve the puzzles.

Shep just savoring the full sensory experience.

Shep just savoring the full sensory experience.

Huge thanks to everyone who made this exhibition possible. Especially to Ashley Eriksmoen who invited me to ANU and who was such a generous, supportive and inspiring host. To Jason O’Brien who did such wonderful work with my prints and who was forever cheerful despite my constant hounding. To Jason Kochel for all his help with the gallery. And finally to all the staff and students of the Furniture Workshop at the ANU School of Art, who welcomed me, worked late at night with me, and who dedicated themselves to the art, whimsy and mystery of whittling.

Hybrid Artifact #2 (for John Bartram) – with Matthew Hebert

My colleague and co-conspirator Matthew Hebert (San Diego State University) and I have just completed a new work in our series (two makes a series, yes?) of Hybrid Artifacts that marry the ancient craft of whittling with contemporary digital manufacturing technologies. This is the culmination of our project at the Bartram Gardens in Philadelphia which I posted about on my first visit for the project in November 2011. Its been a long term project and we’ve worked with many collaborators along the way – the list of whittlers is at the end of this post. There is a summary of the project on my portfolio page.  I thought a more expanded description might be appreciated here on the blog.

Here’s our statement about the piece – illustrated along the way with process shots!

“John Bartram’s garden and collecting expeditions provided the first systematic exports of the botanical wonders of North America to England and then on to Europe. This happened in the midst of the European Enlightenment and the materials that Bartram supplied helped establish the foundations of the modern scientific fields of taxonomy and plant hybridization. The transport of these specimens in ‘Bartram’s Boxes’ was a technical (and often logistical and political) accomplishment in its own right. The seeds, seedlings and plants that travelled on the long and dangerous voyage across the Atlantic ended their journey in the hands and glasshouses of some of the most advanced plant biologists living at the time. In effect they inspired and provided the substance of a revolution in biological science that is still being played out today. Interestingly enough, this happened through a direct correspondence between two individuals on opposite sides of the ocean. Two men who both displayed extraordinary passion for the North American flora, a certain impatience and frustration with the tyranny of the distance between them, and a long-standing friendship and collegiality, which was never consummated by them meeting face to face. These two men were John Bartram, striving to both farm and explore the newly colonized East coast of America, and Peter Collinson in England, working hard to both enrich his own modest garden and to help distribute Bartram’s Boxes to the leading gardens and research facilities in England and Europe.

The seeds for “Hybrid Artifact#2 (for John Bartram)” originated from Bartram’s garden in Philadelphia. Donald Fortescue milled a freshly fallen Willow Oak tree on site and made 16 green wood ‘Fortescue’s boxes’.

'Milling' willow oak - part 1

‘Milling’ willow oak at the gardens.

'Milling' willow oak - Part 2

‘Milling’ willow oak at Michael Hurwitz’s studio.

Raw (and very wet) lumber

Raw (and very wet) lumber

Box building production line

Box building production line

Fortescue's boxes

Fortescue’s boxes

A group of enthusiastic students from the University of the Arts, the Buck’s County Community College and the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, hand whittled small wooden sculptures from wood from the Gardens and provided a hypothetical text description of the completed pieces. These small sculptures were then individually and carefully packed in the ‘Fortescue’s Boxes’ and shipped across the country to Matthew Hebert waiting with great anticipation in San Diego, California, all the way across the US – 2,700 miles (a tad less than the 3,550 miles covered by Bartram’s Boxes).

Happy whittlers

Happy whittlers

Caterpillar Skate

Caterpillar Skate

Kubrick

Kubrick Shifter

The full collection of Bartram whittles and their 'toe tags'

The full collection of Bartram whittles and their ‘toe tags’

Bon voyage!!

Bon voyage!!

Matthew then opened the boxes (conserving them carefully) and began work on his technical translation of Donald’s specimens. Utilizing an array of reverse engineering (3D scanners) and digital fabrication technologies (CNC machines and 3D Printers), Matthew translated the hand-hewn objects into 3D computer models, manipulated them in software, and then re-created them as physical objects. He created negatives of the whittlings and then remounted these in the original boxes; framed and lit from within like Victorian cameos. The descriptions provided by the whittlers were read by artists in Australia and then linked to their respective cameos.

Printing whittles

Printing whittles

The 16 artifacts are arrayed to reflect notions of hybridization, mutation, and genealogy. The subtle textures created by both the hand of the whittler and the processes of digital fabrication highlight the problematic space of contemporary making. The radical changes in society resulting from the scientific revolution in John Bartram’s time are drawn into parallel with the radical changes in contemporary society arising from digital manufacturing.”

Hybrid Artifact #2, 2013

Hybrid Artifact #2, 2013

Plaque

Plaque

A whittle cameo

A whittle cameo

A whittle cameo lit within

A whittle cameo lit from within

 

Huge thanks to Don Miller Jr. and Michael Hurwitz in Philadelphia, to the intrepid  troop of whittlers from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, the Bucks County Community College, and the Indiana University at Pennsylvania for their enthusiasm and contributions to this project, and to the following whittlers for the use of their work –  Lily Baker, Steve Loar, Don Miller Jr., Donald Blankenship, Robert Haskell, Joshua Skott, Catherine Caulfield, Olivia Mays, Sarah Martin, Kevin Bogan, BA Harrington, Kerin Posobiec, Ryan Berardi, Janice Smith and Colin Pezzano, 

Vessel 8: Charting the Waters

Next Friday May 4th is the opening of “Charting the Waters” at the beautiful Vessel Gallery in the heart of the Oakland murmur.

Its rare for me to show work in local galleries so please come by, say hi at the opening and enjoy the work!

OPENING RECEPTION – FRIDAY MAY 4th – 6-8pm

Vessel Gallery, 471 25th Street, Oakland, CA 94612, 510 893 8800
Gallery Hours:  Tuesday through Saturday, 11-6PM

Vessel 8: Charting the Waters May 1 – June 30

A commemorative group show explores the concept of a VESSEL, as a boat, ship, or fleet that navigates and journeys the tides of time.  Works by Bryson Bost, Natalie Cartwright, Donald Fortescue, Jon Gariepy, Nancy Genn, Luke Heimbigner, Mari Marks, Maru Hoeber, Morgania Moore, Walter James Mansfield, John Ruszel, Cyrus Tilton and Sanjay Vora.  Jewelry by Elisa Bongfeldt, Sakura Haru, Hannah Keefe, and Luana Coonen.

TRACES. THREADS. SURFACES.

A three day group show featuring the works of Carlo Abruzzese (paintings), Donald Fortescue (sculpture), Rod Henmi (drawings), Barbara Holmes (installation), Sandra Kelch (works on paper) and Gabriel Russo (assemblages).

If you weren’t able to come out to the aWay station at the Headlands then this is your chance to see some developments from that work.

As well as some great new work by some of my dear friends and esteemed fellow artists.

Drop by! Say hi!

A.Muse Gallery, 614 Alabama St. (nr. 18th), 2nd floor. San Francisco.
Friday – Sunday, September 30 – October 2nd, 11am – 6pm daily.

Nathaniel Stern on Sounding in the New Materiality exhibition at MAM

Professor Nathaniel Stern the Head of Digital Studio Practice in the Department of Art+Design at the  Peck School of the Arts of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee wrote an interesting review of the New Materiality Exhibition currently on view at the Milwaukee Art Museum. You can read the whole review here. And here’s his thoughts on Lawrence LaBianca’s and my piece Sounding.

” The exhibition can perhaps best be summarized through the work of the four exhibiting artists/artist teams that spoke at the “Dialogues on Innovation” panel at the Milwaukee Art Museum on April 16th. Collaborative artists Donald Fortescue and Lawrence LaBianca, for example, spoke to Milwaukee activist and printmaker Nicholas Lampert about their piece, Sounding. This work consists of a huge, custom built cabriole-legged table, which was initially filled with beach rocks and sunk to the bottom of the ocean. There it lay, for two months, with a hydrophone to record the ambient sounds of the sea, including the overwhelming swish of waves, the low hum of slow-moving current, and the activity of sea life – the most prominent being the continuous clicks of what must be shrimp in its vicinity. When the artists’ creation reemerged, it brought the bottom of the ocean with it: all the messiness and stink and poetry of the sea – barnacles, rusty parts, plant life, fish scents, mystery and more. It is exhibited with an over sized hornlike funnel, a huge phonograph tied together with zip ties, to amplify the recorded sound.


Sounding, avowedly inspired by Captain Ahab’s hunt for an un-killable whale, acts as a kind of parallel to the ongoing hunt for singular disciplinary focus in craft. The piece dives into the sea, hits “rock bottom,” and looks as if it barely survived; and on its return, we see that Sounding is far from a singular entity. Yes, it is trashed and torn, but it’s also imbued with literal life, entwined with technical innovation, and rich with stories of its journeys. Like the theories and practices behind the current craft movements, it came back more beautiful, more visceral, more sensory, and more technological than it ever was: a new materiality.”

New Materiality at the Milwaukee Art Museum

Over the weekend of April 16/17, Lawrence La Bianca and I flew to Milwaukee to participate in the ‘Dialogues on Innovation’ lecture series at the Milwaukee Museum of Art in conjunction with the New Materiality exhibition. It turned out to be an amazing and rewarding weekend. Several other artists who participated in New Materiality were invited as well, so it was a wonderful opportunity to meet fellow artists, hear about their work directly and to have multi-layered conversations about the parallels between our works and the engagement of the digital in contemporary craft. The other artists invited were Sonya Clark (chair of the craft/material studies program at Virginia Commonwealth University), Tim Tate (glass and video artist and rambunctious bad boy), Christy Matson (textile and sound artist and CCA alumna, currently at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago) and Nathalie Miebach (basketmaker, sculptor, composer and data juggler). Its hard to know where to start in giving you a taste of a rich and multilayered weekend amongst creative thinkers and makers.

A good place to start is where Lawrence and I did, walking along the bridge towards Calatrava’s sculpted, white-boned building; like two Jonah’s about to be swallowed by the whale.

Santiago Calatravas extraordinary extension to MAM on the shores of Lake Michigan.

The lofty atrium space during the MAM After Dark soiree

The greatest treat for Lawrence and I was seeing our work ‘Soundings’ in situ. We haven’t seen the piece for a while and the last time we saw it we had loaded it into a packing crate in SF bound for Boston. So we were interested to see how it had survived its travels. We were delighted to see that the curaors had chosen to place it on the level above the rest of the New Materiality exhibition along with work by Christy Matson and Sony Clark to give all three works a bit more breathing room. We found ourselves in illustrious company among the MAM permanent collection of contemporary, adjacent to other inspiring and cross fertilizing works

Fortescue, LaBianca, Matson, Puryear - niiice!

Beth Lipman’s delightful work was secreted away in the tiny, cramped ‘Glass and Studio Craft Gallery’ nearby. So the floor admonition not to ‘cross the line’ had obviously been violated by someone!

Beth Lipmans delightfully baroque Laid Table (Still Life with Metal Pitcher), 2007

The separation of Lipman’s work from the main galleries is even stranger considering the adjacent (non-segregated) glass work by Josiah McElheny.

Josiah McElhenys Modernity circa 1952, Mirrored and Reflected Infinitely, 2004

Clearly occupying the main stream art discourse was Robert Gober’s Untitled, 1997. The open suitcase reveals a storm water grate through which we can see a weedy rockpool and glimpses of a mysterious bathing/birthing woman. I love the parallels with Soundings in this piece located just a few feet away. The mundane object (suitcase or occasional table) hacked to reveal a constructed liminal landscape/soundscape suggesting something deeper and darker while being superficially seductive.

Robert Gobers Untitled, 1997. Revealing a deep view into...

... pellucid pools of seaweed wafting in the current.

The Milwaukee Museum is such a great gallery. Every time I come visit I’m presented with new juxtapositions of works and get to see new art that I’ve never even known of previously. This visit introduced me to the work of Martha Glowacki.  A new addition to my roster of artists working in and with museums and the histories of scientific views of the world – along with Mark Dion, Fred Wilson, Rosamond Purcell and of course, yours truly.

Glowacki collaborated with the Chipstone Foundation to create a richly embroidered and captivating installation entitled “Loca Miraculi: Rooms of Wonder”. There’s a dense and very nicely crafted catalog/gallery guide available which you can view here. The objects on show are mostly derived from the Chipstone’s unrivaled collection of early American decorative arts which are housed in this exhibition in immaculately crafted interactive cabinets made especially for the exhibition. Each drawer has its own unique display often accompanied by a sound element triggered by its opening. I really appreciate that the display, the historical works and the contemporary art pieces are seamlessly woven together in this exhibition. All in keeping with the spirit of the Wunderkammern where the works of man and of nature (both imagined and real) were given equal weight.

The first room of Loca Miraculi

The Animalia display including an hermaphrodite deer.

One of the beautifully designed and crafted cabinets with openable drawers

The Grotto of Tethys by Mary Dickey imbedded in one of the drawers.

Human/Nature at the Headlands Center for the Arts.

Last weekend was, theoretically, the closing of Human/Nature at the Headlands Center for the Arts. However, by popular demand and to coincide with the Creative Ecologies event taking place there over the next few weeks, the show has been extended. So you still have a chance to see this interesting exhibition.

Perhaps at the public round table for Creative Ecologies from 1pm on Sunday March 6th, from 1pm.

I got a second chance to wander and contemplate Human/Nature last week when I attended the orientation for the Headland’s Artist in Residence (AIR) program. I have a residency in the Project Space where Human/Nature is showing, in July and August this year. An incredibly exciting (and slightly daunting) prospect. The Project Spaces (there are two) are extraordinarily beautiful spaces with intriguing natural light and panoramic views of the valley heading down to Rodeo Cove. All of the work that is in Human/Nature resonates with the physical environment and does so directly by connecting with the views through the huge windows in the Project Spaces. I’m really enjoying this early ideation stage of getting to know the space and thinking about what might work within the scale of the Project Space, within the context of the larger environment of the Headlands and within my own conceptual framework. Its such a strange (and  yet familiar) dance.

Here’s a, hopefully mouthwatering, sampling from Human/Nature. This is just a taste! See it ‘in the flesh’ soon!

The West Project Space at the Headlands Center for the Arts.

My "Panopticon", in situ.

Andy Vogt's "Built by Destruction".

Jesse Schlesinger's "Elemental Drawing", using salvaged cypress logs from the Headlands,

which connects to a counterpart in the landscape viewed through the adjacent window.

Ben Venom's "Raised by Wolves", made from recycled heavy metal t-shirts.

Nathan Lynch's "They had a way of cleaning everything", ceramic.

Matthew Mullin's "Beetles". Extraordinarily detailed watercolor of something equally as painstaking.

Martin Machado's "Days on the Bay 1".

Detail

Youngsuk Suh's "Swans", in situ with the borrowed landscapes and archaeo-tectural detailing of the Project Space.

Family Tree: Fine Woodworking in Northern California. Opens January 21

Cullen-neptune tabpeFamily Tree: Fine Woodworking in Northern California  

Opens January 21

Petaluma Arts Center

We eagerly await the arrival of our first exhibition of 2011, Family Tree: Fine Woodworking in Northern California. On exhibit from January 21 – March 13 in the G.K. Hardt Gallery, the collection will feature 25 artists whose work has influenced the important California contemporary fine woodworking movement since World War II. Artists include J.B. Blunk, Arthur Espenet Carpenter, Bob Stocksdale and many others. On view in the Community Gallery will also be faculty selected work by students from the Furniture Design program at California College of the Arts.

The Artists Reception is Saturday, January 22, 2 – 4pm.

Now Online! Throughout the exhibition will be weekend demonstrations, lectures and events such as a curator-led tour, lathe-turning demonstration, gilding and patination workshop and bridge-building for families. The complete listing of exhibiting artists and events is now posted on our website.