David Nash – Icon

We just returned to London after a long day’s drive traversing the UK. We woke this morning in Blaenau Ffestiniog in northwestern Wales and hit London in the late afternoon (in time for a well-deserved pint of Guiness at our local the ‘Bird in Hand’).

We headed to Wales primarily to visit the studio of the world renowned artist David Nash. I’ve known David for 12 years and have worked with him on a number of occassions in California and at Penland Crafts Center in North Carolina. I’ve always wanted to see his studio converted from a huge old church in this frugal slate mining town imbedded in the stark but splendid Snowdonia National Park.

David is consistently incredibly hard working, busy and perhaps even over-committed. He was preparing to head off to London and California after having just returned from installing a commission in Basel. But he spared an afternoon and gave us an inside view of his various studio/work places scattered around the village and took us to his 4 hectare living workshop in the woods downstream from the town. I really wanted to physically experience this space and to walk amongst and touch the living trees that David is collaborating with in the construction of these works which are rooted in the Welsh countryside. I love the fact that these works are immovable (we have to make the effort to go and see them and they will never appear at your local Museum of Modern Art), that they take decades to develop, that they require regular care and maintenance, that they don’t always behave the way David expects them too, and that in tending and responding to them David is constantly learning and growing himself.

Thank you David for sharing your time and your work space with us!

David's wonderful converted church studio nestled under an imposing pile of slate waste

David's wonderful converted church studio nestled under an imposing pile of slate waste

Inside the church - an ongoing ever changing retrospective

Inside the church - an ongoing ever changing retrospective

Works in the studio

Works in the studio

Works in the studio

Works in the studio

David's main work area - open air but under cover

David's main work area - open air but under cover

Recent works and winter firewood in the drying room

Recent works and winter firewood in the drying room

Keeping track

Keeping track

Ash dome

Ash dome


Artificial order meets artificial chaos in the Welsh countryside

Artificial order meets artificial chaos in the Welsh countryside

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